Science Articles

Eight Equations That Changed the World

The world has experienced millions of changes throughout some thousands of years. Amendments were made in scientific, technological, cultivation, social, industrial and many other fields.


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The world has experienced millions of changes throughout some thousands of years. Amendments were made in scientific, technological, cultivation, social, industrial and many other fields. Scientists and revolutionaries have worked hard to make this world a better place to live.
The brightest minds in history have used mathematics to lay the foundation of how we measure and perceive our universe. Famous equations were capable of accelerating the revolution in hundreds of fields together. It has been proved that only one single equation is all it takes to alter the course of humanity. Here are eight renowned equations that did just that:

1. Newton’s Law of Gravitation: The law formulated by Sir Isaac Newton when an apple dropped on his head, explains why the planets move the way they do and how gravity works, both on earth and all over the universe. This has helped us understand what weight is and what tidal waves are. This equation was the defacto equation for nearly 200 years before the theory of relativity replaced it.

2. Einstein’s Theory of Relativity: The by and large acknowledged theory on the relationship between space and time is one of the most famous undertakings of Albert Einstein. First proposed in 1905, the Theory of Relativity has radically modified the course of physics and deepened our awareness of the cosmos’ past, present and future.
E=mc^2

3. The Pythagorean Theorem: One of the most ancient theorems, first recorded around 570 and 495 BC is a fundamental principle that sets the basis of all kinds of geometry and the basis for the definition of distance between two points.
a^2+b^2=c^2

4. Maxwell’s Equations: James Clerk Maxwell’s set of equations describe how electric and magnetic fields are generated and altered, both by each other and by charges and currents. First published between 1861 and 1862, they set the foundation for classical electromagnetism.

5. The Second Law of Thermodynamics: Rudolf Clausius’ Law of Thermodynamics states that energy always flows from higher concentrations to lower concentrations. It also states that whenever energy moves or there’s a change in energy, it becomes less useful. Since 1865, it has led to the improvement of many technologies like internal combustion engines.
dS?0

6. Logarithms: Pioneered by John Napier in the early 1600s, logarithms are a way to simplify calculations. Logarithms were put to use by early navigators, scientist and engineers.
log?xy=log?x+log?y

7. Calculus: Calculus is that branch of mathematics that deals with derivatives and integral of functions by methods originally based on the summation of infinitesimal differences. Calculus deals with two branches namely differential calculus and integral calculus. Newton used calculus to develop his laws of motion and gravitation in the 1600s.
df/dt=(lim)?(h?0)??(f(t+h)-f(t))/h?

8. Schrodinger’s Equation: The equation explains how the quantum state of a quantum system changes with time. Developed by Erwin Schrodinger in 1926, it administers the behavior of atoms and subatomic particles in quantum mechanics. This equation lays the root of quantum mechanics and paved the way for quantum computing, nuclear power etc.