Stem Career

Nanotechnology Engineer

A nanotechnology engineer seeks to learn new things that can change the face of health, science, technology, and the environment on a molecular level. They test for pollutants, create powders to enrich our foods and medicines, and study the smallest fragments of DNA

Nanotechnology Engineer
EDUCATIONMedical degree, Ph.D.
WORK EXPERIENCENone
WORK ENVIRONMENTAt a Lab
STATE AREA DATAExplore resources for employment and wages by state and area for Nanotechnology Engineering
ICONIC PEOPLEKrishna Palem
COMPANIESCouncil for Scientific and Industrial Research
HIGHER STUDIESUniversity of Madras

A nanotechnology engineer is someone who works around the smallest, most amazing fragments of science. From storing and altering things on the cellular level, to creating new, tiny pieces of electronics, nanotechnology engineers are the cream of the crop, possessing an acute attention to detail and a strong drive to make things better.

Nanotechnology (“nanotech“) is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular technology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter which occur below the given size threshold. It is therefore common to see the plural form “nanotechnologies” as well as “nanoscale technologies” to refer to the broad range of research and applications whose common trait is size. Because of the variety of potential applications (including industrial and military), governments have invested billions of dollars in nanotechnology research. Until 2012, through its National Nanotechnology Initiative, the USA has invested $3.7 billion, the European Union has invested $1.2 billion and Japan has $750 million.